Panorama Internal Mode: Presets & Maps

Panorama P1/P4/P6 Support

A Panorama Preset is a very flexible thing.

As you might expect, a Preset contains memorized assignments for every controller and pad, plus keyboard splits and layers, their program assignments, and the status of the various wheels, buttons, aftertouch and the pedal, among other things.

But each of the 20 Presets actually contains “sub-presets” of its own which we call Maps: one for the keyboard, one for the pads, and one for the F-Keys. There are five Keyboard Maps, 20 Pad Maps, and 10 F-Key maps, and you can select one from each category when constructing a Preset. When the Preset is stored it will remember the Map assignments you chose for it.

The Presets are located in Internal mode, but there’s always a Preset active even when you are in the other modes. But to access them, edit them or save them you need to be in Internal mode.

We’ll start with the basics of loading a Preset and then we’ll talk about the Maps.

Loading Presets & Maps

Loading a Preset
The process of loading a new Preset couldn’t be simpler. First, press the Internal mode button so your display looks like Image 1.

The fourth menu button (M4) is labeled “Load”. Press M4 to access the Load menu. (Image 2)

The highlighted section of the display indicates the item that will change when you turn the data knob. In this case the Preset has been selected, so that’s where you want to be.

But before you proceed, keep in mind that when you load a Preset, the three maps that are listed below it in the display will be loaded also. If you’ve made changes to any of the active Maps, or to the Preset itself, you may want to save them to memory first. See the linked articles below for information about Save mode.

To continue, once you see the Preset you want in the display, press M4 (Load) again and it will be loaded into Panorama’s memory.

Loading a Map
Maps are loaded the same way Presets are. If you’re not already there, press the Internal mode button to start from the top level of Internal mode. Then press the button labeled “Load” (M4) to access the Load menu.

The next step is to use Menu button 1 (the Down arrow) to select the Map you would like to change. Image 3 shows how the display will look when the Pad Map has been selected.

The Pad Map line is highlighted in red, which means that’s what will change when you turn the data knob.

Again, be advised that when you load a Pad Map into memory it will replace the Pad Map that is currently active. So if you’ve made changes you don’t want to lose, make sure to save the active Pad map to memory before loading a new one. See the linked articles below for information about Save mode.

To continue, once you see the Pad Map you want in the display, press M4 (Load) again and it will be loaded into Panorama’s memory.

The Map loading process described above is the same for each Map, so if you want to load a different Keyboard Map or one of the F-Keys Maps, just select it in the screen using the Down / Up arrow buttons (M1 and M2) and follow the instructions for that Map instead.

Another important detail to know is that the Map(s) you just loaded into active memory will be linked to the current Preset when you Save that Preset to memory. So once you like the combination of the Preset and Maps you’ve created, be sure to save the Preset to one of the 20 Preset memory locations for later recall.

One more thing: There’s another way to select new Maps outside of Load mode, too. Check out the sections about Keyboard Maps, Pad Maps and F-Keys Maps for more information.

Saving and naming Presets & Maps

Saving a Preset
At its most basic level this process is similar to loading a Preset, only with two extra steps involved. Starting from the top page of Internal mode, press the fifth menu button (M5), which is labeled “Setup”. You’ll see this: (Image 4)

Use the data knob to scroll through the menu list until Save is highlighted. Then press M5 again to enter the Save menu. (Image 5)

The keyboard icon at the top of the display is highlighted in red, which means the selected Preset will be overwritten if you proceed. Be sure this is what you want to do first!

If you want to save the Preset to a different location, use the data knob to select another. Once you’ve chosen a memory location, press the fourth menu button (M4) to advance into the Confirmation screen. After reviewing what is about to be saved, and where, if something doesn’t look right then press the second menu button (M2). This will cancel the Save process. But if everything is correct, press the first menu button (M1). This will save the Preset where you want it.

Remember too that part of what is saved with a Preset are pointers to the three maps that are listed below it on the Save page. So the next time you load this Preset from memory, the Map associations will be restored also.

There’s more to know about Save mode, but we’ll get into that a bit later.

Naming a Preset
You may want to give a Preset a new name when you save it. There’s a menu button in the middle of the display that gives you this option while in Save mode. (Image 6)

Menu button 3 (M3) is labeled Rename. Press it and the current name will appear at the top of the display with the first character flashing red. (Image 7)

You have several options at this point:

  • Alter the letter by turning the data knob.
  • Navigate through the characters in the name by pressing the left or right arrows (menu buttons 1 and 2). (The character field being edited will turn red.)
  • Select a different type of character by pressing menu button 3 (labeled A1_). The first press will make numbers available; the second will make non-alphanumeric characters available. Turning the data knob will show which characters are available in each case.

Once you’ve used the eight available character fields to make the name you want, press M4 to advance into the Confirmation screen. After reviewing the name and destination, press M1 (Yes) to store your renamed Preset.

More about Save mode
It is also possible to save each of the Maps independently. You’ll want to do this if you’ve made any changes to the note number assignments of the Pads, for example, or have changed the split points in a Keyboard Map. We’ll cover the Maps in greater detail in other articles (see below), but here’s a quick overview.

The process for saving each of the Maps is basically the same as saving a Preset; the main difference is that you need to use the Down/Up arrows on menu buttons 1 and 2 to select which Map you want to save. The Map that is highlighted in Image 8 is the one that will be saved.

Once you’ve selected the Map you want to save, the process is identical to saving a Preset: use the data knob to select the destination, rename the Map if you like, press Save to advance into the Confirmation page, and then press Yes or No depending on what you want to do.

But rather than saving each Map in a separate action, it is possible to save them all at once. To learn how to do that, read the next section, “Save All”.

Save All

As mentioned elsewhere, a Preset contains the assignments for every controller, pad and button, plus keyboard splits and layers, program changes and other MIDI data for each zone. Any one of these items can be edited to suit your current project or an upcoming performance. When everything is the way you want it, you will want to save what you’ve done.

But rather than going through the process of saving the Preset, then the Pad Map, then the Keyboard Map, then the F-Keys Map, Panorama has a feature called Save All which will take care of saving all of those items at the same time.

Note that there’s an important distinction between saving a Preset on its own and using the Save All feature. When you save a Preset as described in the article “Preset basics: Saving and naming Presets and Maps”, what is being saved is the Preset itself along with links that point to the Maps that are part of the Preset. But this process does not save the Maps themselves, just a number that tells Panorama which Maps to call up when loading the Preset. If you have edited the Maps associated with the current Preset, then you will want to save them as well. Save All is the fastest way to do that.

Accessing the Save All page
The Save All process starts out the same way as saving a Preset: From the top level of Internal mode, press the Menu button labeled “Setup” and use the data knob to scroll to the Save option. After you press the menu button labeled “Enter” you’ll be inside Save mode.

At this point you could use the Down menu button (M1) to select individual Maps for saving, and each Map would be highlighted in red one after the other. But if you start out in Save mode by pressing the Up menu button (M2), you’ll see all three Maps and the Preset highlighted in red at the same time. This means you have accessed the Save All feature.

Here’s what’s happening in Image 9. At the very top of the display the words “Save to Preset:   5” tell you that the Preset itself is about to be saved to memory location #5, along with the links pointing to Pad Map 15, Keyboard Map 4, and F-Keys Map 7. The fact that all of the Maps are highlighted too means the currently active Maps are also about to be written to the selected locations (15, 4, and 7, respectively). So all of their current note and controller assignments will be preserved at the same time.

Important note: The locations highlighted on the Save All page are about to be overwritten with the currently active Preset and all three Maps. If the destinations contain settings you don’t want to lose, make sure you choose different destinations.

However, if everything looks good you can proceed with the Save All process the same way you would if you were merely saving a Preset or Map: press button M4 (Save) and review the choices you’ve made on the Confirmation page. (Image 10)

You’ll notice that the Confirmation page looks different here than it does when saving a single item, because it lists all four items, their names, and their destinations on the same page. Press “No” to cancel or “Yes” to overwrite the listed items, or you can press M5 (Setup) to back up one level to the Save page and change the destinations or names if you like.

Choosing different destinations for the Preset or Maps
While saving the Preset and the Maps you may realize you need to choose a different location for one or more of those items to avoid overwriting something you want to keep. This is as simple as selecting the items one at a time and then turning the data knob to choose the new location. For more details on how to save an individual item to a new memory location, see the article “Preset basics: Saving and naming Presets and Maps”.

Once you are sure you have selected the proper target destinations for each item that is about to be saved, use the Down/Up arrows (M1 and M2) to re-enter Save All mode. After pressing the Save button (M4) you will be taken to the Confirmation page so you can review the names and destinations that are about to be written to memory.

One more thing…
You may have noticed another difference between the Save and Save All pages: the Rename button is not shown on the Save All page. If you want to rename the Preset or the Maps, that will need to be handled separately for each item before accessing the Save All function. See the next section, “How to rename everything while saving” for an efficient way to handle that process.

How to rename everything while saving

You may have noticed another difference between the Save and Save All pages: the Rename button appears on Menu button 3 (M3) in Save mode… (Image 11)

…but it is not shown on the Save All page in Image 12.

So if you want to rename the Preset or the Maps, that will need to be handled for each item individually before accessing the Save All function.

Here’s the quickest way we’ve found to handle that for multiple items:

  1. Start on the Save page.
  2. Select the item to rename.
  3. Press Rename.
  4. Rename the item.
  5. Press Setup: Save is still selected in the Setup menu. (Image 13)
  6. Press Enter. You’ll be back at the top level of Save, and the new name for the previous item is preserved.
  7. Press the Down arrow (button M1) to select the next item to rename.
  8. Repeat steps 3-7 until every item has the name you want.
  9. When you’re done, use the Down/Up arrows (buttons M1 and M2) to re-enter Save All mode.
  10. Press Save and continue to the Confirmation page. It will look something like Image 14
  11. Press Yes and all items will be stored with their new names.

For specifics regarding each of the steps listed above, refer to the articles listed below.

Keyboard Maps: Defining and Editing the Zones

What would a MIDI keyboard controller be without the ability to split and layer sounds? Panorama’s Keyboard Maps offer a great deal of flexibility in this area, with lots of other features thrown in for good measure.

We’ll talk about each feature a Keyboard Map contains, and then walk through how to use them one by one.

What is a Keyboard Map?
A Panorama Keyboard Map contains the following for each of its four keyboard zones:

  • Enable / disable status for the zone.
  • MIDI channel assignment.
  • Low note / high note range settings.
  • Octave and transposition settings.
  • Program change and Bank number (both MSB and LSB).
  • Independent on /off toggle for each of six MIDI controllers (the wheels, pedals, aftertouch, and the Performance buttons).

That’s a lot of options for each zone! Using various combinations of these settings makes it possible to layer the sounds and/or split them across different ranges of the keyboard, while setting up the MIDI controllers to affect or not affect one or more zones. In short, a Keyboard Map gives you plenty of control over your MIDI rig so you can set it up to respond exactly the way you want.

Keyboard Maps: Overview
First, how do you navigate to the Keyboard Maps? There are three main ways:


  1. From the Internal mode home page:

    From wherever you are in the Panorama’s menus, you can always press one of the four Mode buttons to return to that mode’s home page. That’s one of the ways to locate the Keyboard Maps: press the Internal mode button.

    But there are actually two pages which can be referred to as the ‘Internal mode home page’, and each has the Zones button on Menu button 3 (M3). The Faders page has it (Image 15)…

    …and so does the Encoders page: (Image 16)

    Whichever of those two pages you see, press M3 (Zones) and you’ll access the top level of the Zones page. We’ll look at the Zones page itself a bit later.

  2. From the Setup menu:

    There are lots of Internal mode pages from which you can access the Setup menu (the Global page, the Save page, the Control Edit pages, etc.). It will always be located on Menu button 5 (M5). And in most of the cases when you don’t see the word ‘Setup’ on the display, you’ll see an arrow that will take you back to a page where Setup is on M5. So you’re never more than a second button press away from the Setup menu.

    So however you get there, when you press M5 (Setup) you’ll see the scroll window pop up: (Image 17)

    Turn the data encoder to the word ‘Zones’, press M5 (Enter), and you’re there: the top level of the Zones page. We’ll look at the Zones page itself after the next section.

  3. By way of the Performance buttons:

    The PB1 and PB2 buttons are very useful in their own right, but when you press them both at the same time they take you ‘under the hood’ into the Performance Button assignment page. There are a lot of interesting features to be found here, but for now we’ll just point out that Menu button 4 (M4) has the word ‘Zones’ on it. (Image 18)

    Press M4 and Panorama will take you to the top level of the Zones page.

Now let’s take a look at the Zones page: (Image 19)

Working left to right and top to bottom, let’s go through the information the Zones page shows:

  • Data line: this shows the assignment of and the last transmitted value for the last fader, knob, pad or button you used.
  • Info bar: tells you the Octave and Transposition settings and the name of the active Preset.
  • Keyboard graphic: displays the entire 128 note MIDI keyboard range for a visual reference.
  • Settings for each zone: low note, MIDI channel, octave shift, transposition, and high note.
  • Enable / disable buttons for each zone: When lit red, that zone is active. When not lit, the zone is not active.
  • ‘Return’ arrow: takes you back to the page from which you accessed the Zones display.

Here’s a line-by-line breakdown of each zone line in the screen shot above:

  • Zone 1: active within the MIDI note range of C-2 to B2. It is assigned to the Global MIDI channel (G), which is defined on the Global page. It is not transposed.
  • Zone 2: active within the MIDI note range of C3 to B3. It is assigned to MIDI channel 2, which will not change if the Global channel is changed. It is transposed upward by one octave.
  • Zone 3: disabled, but can be instantly activated by pressing M3, at which point it will be layered with Zone 2 from C3-B3 and extend beyond that to MIDI note G4. It is assigned to MIDI channel 3, which will not change if the Global channel is changed. It is transposed +7 semitones, or a musical fifth upward.
  • Zone 4: active within the MIDI note range of G#4 to C8. It is assigned to MIDI channel 4, which will not change if the Global channel is changed. It is transposed downward by one octave.

Enabling and disabling Zones
When Panorama is on the Zones page, the first four Menu buttons are dedicated to enabling and disabling Zones 1-4. In the picture above you will notice that the graphics above buttons M1, M2, and M4 have a red light inside, while the graphic above M3 shows a button that is ‘dark’. This means that Zone 3 is currently disabled.

However, if you press M2 and then press M3, you will notice that the M2 graphic goes ‘dark’ and the M3 button becomes lit, like so: (Image 20)

This simple change means that now Zone 2 has become disabled and Zone 3 has now been enabled.

Changing the range of a Zone


It’s easy to change the range of a Zone, and the process is so quick that you could even do it ‘on the fly’ during a live performance.

In Image 21 the first three Zones are active.

Let’s say what you want to do is play an acoustic piano across the full keyboard, but you’d also like to have a bass sound on the left side of the keyboard and a string sound on the right. We’ll choose Zone 1 for the acoustic piano, Zone 2 for the bass, and Zone 3 for the strings. The piano range is already set for Zone 1, so we only need to change Zones 2 and 3.

To change the range for Zone 2, hold down Menu button 2 for two seconds. The top line of the display will change to read ‘Zone 2 Range Low (Press Key)’: (Image 22)

Press the bottom key on the keyboard to set the lower limit of the bass sound to MIDI note C1 (or use the Octave Down button to select a lower note). After the low note has been entered, Panorama will ask you to enter the high note limit for the bass sound: (Image 23)

In this example we didn’t change the Octave range of the keyboard, so all we have to do is press the middle-most B key to set the upper limit to MIDI note B2. But if you used the Octave Down button to set the low note, just use the Octave Up button to put the keyboard back to the original range and select the B2 key. Panorama will exit the Zone range selection process and return to normal operation with Zone 2 assigned to the range of C1-B2.

As with Zone 2, in order to change the range for Zone 3 you need to hold down Menu button 3 for two seconds. The top line of the display will change to read ‘Zone 3 Range Low (Press Key)’: (Image 24)

The low note for Zone 3 in this example will be the next note higher than the high note of Zone 2. So play the C3 key (middle C) and the display will advance to the Zone 3 high note input page: (Image 25)

At this point the task is complete: you’ve layered two split sounds on top of an acoustic piano. The display will look like this: (Image 26)

See the article ‘Zone Editing’ for information about changing the MIDI channels, octave/transpose settings, and the MIDI controller states.

Keyboard Maps: Editing the Zones
Here we will dig deeper and uncover things about the Keyboard Maps that are less obvious, but are just as essential in providing maximum control and flexibility over MIDI devices

For starters, we’ll need to access Zone Edit mode:

  1. Press the Internal button so your Panorama is at the Internal mode home page.
  2. Press Menu button 5 (M5) which is labeled ‘Setup’.
  3. Use the data encoder and scroll through the list until you reach ‘Zone Edit’: (Image 27)
  4. Press M5, which is labeled ‘Enter’ now. That will take you into the Zone Edit page for Zone 1. It’ll look like Image 28.

Let’s work through the information on the display from the top down and from left to right and see what it represents.

  • The top line tells you which MIDI controller number was last transmitted, and what its value was. It has no impact on the Zone settings, but it’s there so we thought it best to mention it!
  • The second line has three sections: the left-most section tells you that all of the settings you see on this page belong to Zone 1, which is currently being edited. The right-most section indicates that Panorama is currently in Zone Edit mode.
  • The keyboard graphic shows the entire MIDI note range. The bracket beneath the keyboard graphic and the text immediately below that at either edge tell you that Zone 1 is currently covering the MIDI note range from C-2 to G8 (which is the entire MIDI note range: 128 notes). ‘Lo’ is the low note indicator; ‘Hi’ is the high note indicator.

At this point the display splits into two columns, with the MIDI channel, transposition and program/bank select information on the left and the MIDI Controller toggles on the right.

Note: you can use the data encoder to change the value of any of the following parameters:

  • ‘Channel: Global’ means that Zone 1 is set to the Global MIDI channel. The actual MIDI channel number is determined in Global mode. If this value is changed there, then all the MIDI data generated by Zone 1 will be transmitted on whatever the new MIDI channel number becomes. But if you want to change this Zone to transmit on a ‘fixed’ MIDI channel that won’t change when the Global channel is changed, use the data encoder to select a MIDI channel number between 1 and 16.
  • ‘Octave’ and ‘Transpose’: The combination of these settings allows Zone 1 to be transposed by any number of notes relative to the other Zones. They can be set positively or negatively using the data encoder.
  • ‘Program’ and ‘Bank LSB/MSB’: These numbers allow each Zone to send a program change number and a set of bank select numbers to an external device for the sake of selecting which sound to play. Some devices will need to see both an LSB (Least Significant Byte) and an MSB (Most Significant Byte) in order to change from one bank to another.

Reminder: use the data encoder to change the setting of any of the MIDI Controller toggles:

  • Pitch bend: On or Off: When the pitch bend wheel is active for a certain Zone, an ‘X’ will appear in this box. When an ‘X’ is not present, the pitch bend wheel has been disabled for that Zone.
  • Modulation: On or Off: When the modulation wheel is active for a certain Zone, an ‘X’ will appear in this box. When an ‘X’ is not present, the modulation wheel has been disabled for that Zone.
  • Aftertouch: On or Off: When the Panorama’s aftertouch (pressure-sensitivity) is active for a certain Zone, an ‘X’ will appear in this box. When an ‘X’ is not present, aftertouch has been disabled for that Zone.
  • Sustain: On or Off: When the sustain pedal is active for a certain Zone, an ‘X’ will appear in this box. When an ‘X’ is not present, the sustain pedal has been disabled for that Zone.
  • Expression: On or Off: When the expression pedal is active for a certain Zone, an ‘X’ will appear in this box. When an ‘X’ is not present, the expression pedal has been disabled for that Zone.
  • MIDI FX: On or Off: When the Performance buttons are active for a certain Zone, an ‘X’ will appear in this box. When an ‘X’ is not present, the Performance buttons have been disabled for that Zone.

The bottom line of the display, as with all other pages, shows the labels for the Menu buttons 1-5. On the Zone Edit page, these buttons will do the following:

  • Down Arrow (M1): pressing this button will select the next parameter down the list. When the highlighted cursor reaches ‘Bank MSB’, the next press takes you to the top of the column on the right and the Pitch Bend On/Off parameter. When it reaches ‘MIDI FX’, the next press ‘wraps around’ to the top of the column on the left and the Channel parameter.
  • Up Arrow (M2): pressing this button selects the next-highest parameter on the list. When the highlighted cursor reaches ‘Channel’, the next press ‘wraps around’ to the bottom of the column on the right and the MIDI FX parameter. When it reaches ‘Pitch bend’, the next press takes you to the bottom of the column on the left and the Bank MSB parameter.
  • Next Zone Arrow (M3): Since we’re editing Zone 1 currently, pressing this button once will take us to Zone 2. There’s a complete set of every parameter we’ve discussed so far available for Zones 2-4.
  • Range (M4): This button initiates a second method of defining split points and overlapping Zones. (The other method is discussed in the article ‘Keyboard Maps: Defining the Zones’.)
  • Setup (M5): As on many other pages, pressing this button brings up the Setup menu. You can use the data encoder to scroll to one of the available pages and select it by pressing Enter. Quick tip: You can also use this as a quick way to get from Zone 2 to Zone 1: since the last choice you made from the Setup menu was Zone Edit, pressing M5 twice will take you back to the starting point of the Zone Edit pages, which selects Zone 1 by default. It’s ever-so-slightly faster than pressing M3 three times to cycle through Zones 3 and 4 and back to Zone 1.

Setting the Zone Range within Zone Edit
This is a slightly different method for setting the Zone Range than was described in the article ‘Keyboard Maps: Defining the Zones’. It’s actually identical except for one thing: where the other method gives you one shot to set the low/hi note limits of a Zone, this method will keep allowing you to refine the limits until you decide to exit the process. The other method is great for ‘on-the-fly’ changes during a performance, for example; you can see all four Zones from the same page and change the note limits of any one of the Zones very quickly. In contrast, the method described below shows you all of the settings of one particular Zone at a time, settings which include the low/hi note limits.

The beauty of having two methods in two different locations is that you can decide which method to use depending on what sort of work you are doing at the time.

So now that we’re on the Zone Edit page, here’s how to set the Zone Range.


  • Press M4 (Range). The upper portion of the button graphic will light red, like so: (Image 29)

    Note also that the top line of the display is asking you to press a key so it can set the lower limit for Zone 1. So…

  • Press a key on the keyboard to define the low note for Zone 1. You can use the Octave Down/Up buttons to reach any note within the MIDI note range of C-2 to G8.

    Now the top line of the display is asking you to press a key so it can set the upper limit for Zone 1. (Image 30)

    So of course the next thing to do is…

  • Press another key to define the high note for Zone 1. Use the Octave Down/Up buttons to reach the desired note. Once you’ve selected a note, the bracketed area under the MIDI keyboard graphic will show a visual representation of the range: (Image 31)
  • As mentioned earlier, this method of setting the low/high note limits will keep cycling between the low limit and the high limit; it will not exit automatically. So the top line will ask you to set the low limit again. If you’d like to refine the note range for Zone 1, set another low note, then another high note, etc., until you are satisfied.
  • When the lower and upper note limits for this Zone are set the way you like, you can do one of two things:
    1. Press M3 to select the next Zone and continue setting its low/high note limits, or…
    2. Press M4 to exit the note range setting process.

Keyboard Maps: Quick select

A Panorama Keyboard Map contains the following for each of its four keyboard zones:

  • Enable / disable status for the zone.
  • MIDI channel assignment.
  • Low note / high note range settings.
  • Octave and transposition settings.
  • Program change and Bank number (both MSB and LSB).
  • Independent on /off toggle for each of six MIDI controllers (the wheels, pedals, aftertouch, and the Performance buttons [PB]).

The obvious method for selecting a Keyboard Map, at first glance anyway, is through the Load button on the Internal mode home page (Menu button 4). This is fairly quick and easy, and may be the best route if you also plan to load a new Preset and other new Maps at the same time.

But if you only want to load a new Keyboard Map and nothing else, there’s an even quicker way to do it.

First, press both PB1 and PB2 at the same time. This will take you to the Performance Button assignment page, which will look something like Image 32.

Menu button 3 (M3) is labeled ‘Keymap’ (and is circled in the picture above).

Note: following the process outlined below will replace the currently active Keyboard Map with another one from memory. If you have made changes to the Keyboard Map that you do not want to lose, please save the active Keyboard Map to one of the five Keyboard Map memory locations.

Now that you’ve done that, notice the contents of the information bar: The middle section gives the name of the Keyboard Map that is currently active (in this case, 4 Layers).

Press M3 and a portion of the button will become red. (Image 33)

Also, the name of the current Keyboard Map will begin to flash. These two things mean you have activated the Keymap selection process.

Turn the data encoder and you will be able to scroll between Keyboard Maps 1 and 5 while the name continues to flash. For this example we’ll select Keyboard Map 3, which we’ve named ‘Split C3’. (Image 34)

As soon as you have selected a different Keyboard Map, this will load all four Zones and all the settings found inside the Zone Edit page into the active memory.

Note that the name of the Keyboard Map is still flashing; this is because the Keymap selection process is still active (notice that the upper portion of button M3 is still red). If you’ve selected the Keyboard Map you wanted to select, press M3 again: the Keyboard Map name will stop flashing and the upper portion of M3 will turn to gray. These two things indicate that you have deactivated the Keymap selection process.

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